Annoyed Grunt

If any fans of The Simpsons are reading this, they will understand what I mean by that title.  If not, I’ll let you in on the reasoning at the end.

Well, I effed up my project.  I effed up my project in such a way that I had to perform some surgery on my afghan.

Surgery, you say?!  On an afghan?!  (Of course, by “afghan”, I’m referring to my hand-knitted project, not an actual person from Afghanistan.)

Yes.  I had to perform surgery on it.  Let me show you the “before” pic and explain why.

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This is the section I was working on at the time I noticed a glaring error (note that I had a square in progress).  Do you notice the error yet?

What if I gave you a closer look?

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See that variegated purple L there?  When joined to that dark purple rectangle, it creates three edges to pick up from.  That’s all fine and dandy, except that my method only allows me to use two edges to pick up for a small square, as the space between the two shapes would dictate.  I would have no way to connect the third edge to the other two.  What was I to do?

Well, the square that was in progress was no big deal.  I’d be able to frog that one (which for my non-knitting followers and readers, refers to the act of unraveling a knitted piece all the way to the end, like a frog saying, “Rip it, rip it”), since it was still attached the the skein.  However, two small squares and that variegated purple L were going to have to undergo a yarn-ectomy.  By this, I mean I would have to pick out the ends that I’d already woven in, work my back all the way to the fastening off point, and frog the whole damn piece.  (Pardon my langauge.)

Thankfully, I had already given myself a bit of an out because I have a very specific way that I tend to weave in my ends on these mitered projects.  After fastening off the last stitch or stitches, I will normally weave in that end as follows: I weave up and down alongside my center column (that chain of stockinette that runs up the middle), and then I will weave in and out of a stitch away from the edge or any cast on edges, so it makes a noticeable lump that is easy for me to detect for just this kind of situation.  I do the same thing with the yarn tail that began the piece, weaving along with the grain off the garter stitch present in that part.  When I cut my yarn tails after weaving, I always cut on the right side of the fabric, that way when the tail naturally unravels, it stays on the wrong side of the fabric rather than poke out on the right side.

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Procedure area prior to yarn-ectomy. Note that the pink square that was in progress has already been frogged.

Now, the yarn-ectomy.  First thing you want to do is look for the yarn end.  I ended up using a yarn needle to help me with some of this.  When you locate the yarn end, using a combination of your fingers (which will tug on the yarn end; look on the other side of the fabric  to see where the yarn end tugs and loosen from there, using the yarn needle to pry the yarn loose) and the yarn needle, gradually loosen, pick out the yarn end, and then tug again to find where your yarn end goes next.  Follow the yarn end in this manner until you get to the fasten-off point.

Repeat for the yarn end leading to the cast-on/picked-up edge.  There should be two yarn tails on the piece loosened prior to the next step.

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After both ends are loosened, you are free to frog the piece.

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Frogging in progress.

After frogging, I decided to store the yarn in a Ziploc bag, although this amount of yarn probably will not be enough to reknit the square.  Instead, I will store it in case I am running dangerously low on yarn while working on a shape on that particular color, then I will have enough yarn to work a Russian join (which is basically folding two ends of yarn intersecting each other, and then each tail is sewn in on itself), and finish the shape.

I did the same thing for the small pink square.  The yarn from that one also got stored in its own Ziploc bag.

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When it came time to frog the L, I repeated the same steps as I did for the squares.  However, since it took more yarn to knit the L, I knew I’d probably be able to reknit this yarn into a smaller shape, in this case a rectangle to free up a space to pick up the shape properly.  To keep the yarn from tangling, once I frogged the L, I wound the yarn into a ball and put it in its own Ziploc bag to keep the yarn clean and to allow the yarn to stay in place as I knit it (hence why there is an end hanging out of it).

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And this is what the section looked like after the yarn-ectomy.

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Now, I could replace the L with a rectangle to fill in the space.  Which is just what I did.

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The new rectangle in progress
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The finished rectangle.

I’d say the yarn-ectomy was a success and I am free to move on with this section.

By the way, the title refers to when Homer Simpson didn’t have a way in the script to describe his anger or frustration at things.  This was rendered in the earlier scripts as “(Annoyed Grunt)”.  Eventually this (Annoyed Grunt) became Homer Simpson’s world famous catchphrase, ” D’oh!”

Have a great day, everybody.  Happy reading and happy knitting!

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Author: Crystal P (snowlessknitter)

I'm a thirty-year-old homemaker and ambicraftuous yarn and needle enthusiast from Central Florida. I am a female sports fan, love watching baseball (Red Sox, Braves, and Cubs) and also enjoy cooking, reading, yakking it up on Ravelry, and playing video games (mainly Nintendo and PlayStation).

9 thoughts on “Annoyed Grunt”

    1. Sounds like me and anything having to do with tools. My tool-using skills are pretty much limited to: turning a screwdriver, hammering a nail, turning a wrench, and squeezing a pair of pliers. Hearing my dad and my brother talking about anything having to do with tools or mechanical stuff confuses the crap out of me.

      Me, I’ve untangled enough yarn over the years to the point that I can untangle almost any knot. We all have our strong suits.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Well, I have to commend you for the surgery you performed. I hate it when I have made an error and discover it miles down the line. Luckily the Afghan Hound did not need surgery either lol

    Like

    1. Fantastic read, I just passed this onto a colleague who was doing a little intsivegation on that. And he actually bought me lunch because I found it for him smile So let me rephrase that: Thanks for lunch!

      Like

  2. esta crema con tantas especias tiene que estar deliciosa, yo no soy muy amante del picante, pero el jengibre me encanta, y esta combinación de ingredientes de tu crema, seguro que me va a enacstar.bnts. maite

    Like

  3. jajajjajaaja… Gracias Pal, ya soy mayorcita… de extreme close up se me ven ya las arruguitas, pero de lejos no importa mucho (menos mal que las fotos fueron de lejitos)… Y sigo pensando que estubo buenisia la reunión, y como dije por ahi, tengo nuevos blogs en mi listado…

    Like

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