The First Signs of Fall, a Work in Progress, and Remembering

The calendar reads October, and although the autumnal equinox happened nearly a month ago, it hasn’t felt much like it here.  Save for a few drier days with highs in the low and mid 80s F following Hurricane Irma, the heat that has defined the Florida summer has stuck around all the way into our Tenth Month.  Some of the leaves are only now starting to get the signal, and the weather has started to dry up.  Autumn doesn’t come in an instant in Florida…it’s a transition.  And the biggest sign of that transition will be coming shortly.

Later this week, we will have our first cold front approaching the area.  Albeit, this will be a weak cold front, but it will pack the first punch that will finally knock the summer heat out of the atmosphere over Florida.  We may be seeing some of our last 90s F for the year.  (I use the Fahrenheit abbreviation because I do have some followers that live in metric countries that use the Celsius scale, so the Fahrenheit abbreviation is there to avoid confusion.)  After rain associated with the front clears out, the daytime temperatures should go down to the low 80s F, and nighttime temperatures will remain comfortably in the low 70s F.  There could possibly be another cold front approaching next week and knocking our overnight lows into the upper 60s F, which is close to sweater weather here.  Even though I was born and raised here, I’ve never been a fan of the heat and humidity that comes with the Florida summers…but the autumns and winters here make it worth staying here.

Now, you know by now I am never not knitting, and the sign of a true knitter is that one almost always has something on the needles!  This one is no different.  I started working on the Wonder Woman Wrap about a week or so ago.  I initially cast on in Red Heart’s With Love in Peacock, but I knew there wouldn’t be enough there to finish the project.  So when I went to the store, I was hoping to find another skein of it.  Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to.  So, I decided to start again, this time in a different color, and I decided to pick out Red Heart’s Super Saver in Burgundy, which I figured would pair well with the Soft White I already had in the stash (which I decided to use because I am not a huge fan of yellow).  I should let you know that the resemblance to Santa’s outfit 🎅🏻 is not intentional.

Up to this writing, I am almost finished with the Lower W portion of the Wrap, with about 4 rows left to go before I begin the first of the two Side Stripes.  I don’t have any circular needles longer than 29 inches, so the stitches are completely bunched up, but you can get an idea of the size of the wrap.

Casting on…
First stages of the Lower W
Showing off my work while preparing to Stitch & Pitch (knit and watch baseball)
Halfway through the Lower W section
Four rows left in this section, right in the middle of the Lower W. Note the short row triangle worked below it in Burgundy.

And now the Remembering: I realize I’m a bit slow to this, but two weeks ago, we had one of the darkest days in recent history.  That Monday morning, I awoke to the news that the deadliest mass shooting in American history had taken place, surpassing even the death toll at Pulse just a year ago.  Nearly 60 people were killed and about another 500 were wounded.  My heart breaks for those victims and their families, even two weeks later.  And then later that day came the news that one of Florida’s most legendary musicians, and a man whose song I had just featured on this very blog two days before, had died.  I am, of course, referring to Tom Petty.  Petty was a musician who I think just about all of Florida would be proud to claim as their own, despite the fact that he spent most of his career in California.  Despite that, Petty always kept some sort of connection to his Southern roots in his music, be it in twangy guitar riffs, maintaining a drawl in his singing voice, or his band incorporating thumping drums or swampy, melodic harmonicas into their songs.  His partnership with The Heartbreakers was one that seemed poised to stand the test of time, and his collaborations with his fellow Traveling Wilburys were the things of legends.  Tom was taken from us suddenly and way too early, and two weeks later my heart 💔 still breaks for him and for his Heartbreakers who have lost their dear leader.

I leave you with one of my favorite songs of his, “You Don’t Know How It Feels”.

I hope to be able to share with you all about my brother’s wedding soon, as it will be taking place this weekend.  Next time I write, I shall have legally gained my first-ever set of in-laws.

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The Irma Saga, Part II: The Waiting is the Hardest Part

After this particular part of the story, I could not get that Tom Petty song out of my head.  Which is why I referenced it in the title.

At this point, I should warn you that I don’t have a very linear narrative here…I will jump back and forth in time at points…just bear with me.

One of the biggest things we went through in the aftermath of Irma was one that a good portion of the state of Florida went through: being without power.  After going almost the entire storm without losing power (save for a few flickers throughout the day and evening), Irma finally knocked out our power on her way out of my hometown, at about 6:00 Monday morning, on September 11.  Yes, this is obviously a date of significance here, and because of Irma, this was actually the first time since that tragic morning in 2001 that the memory of those events didn’t really cross my mind (and having watched those attacks play out on live TV, the memories of those images are still ingrained in my mind all these years later…I can still replay those moments and memories in my head, which is why I haven’t felt much of a need to rewatch footage of those attacks).  We were just focused on trying to clean up and get our post-hurricane plans in motion.

Dad set up our generator on our back porch area, and it was this generator that would become our sole power source for the next 5 days.  We got this generator more than a decade ago after the nightmare that was the Triumvirate of Hurricanes in 2004, an experience which I discussed in detail in my last entry, The Irma Saga, Part I: Possibly the Longest Weekend of My Life So Far. Since we’ve gotten this generator, Irma has marked only the second time we have had to use it (the first time was after Hurricane Matthew, which knocked out our power for about 36 hours last year).  Out came the extension cords and power strips, and with a few configurations, we were able to use it to power the following: our refrigerator, the window unit air conditioner in the master bedroom (which my dad normally uses to keep himself from sweating profusely when he sleeps, a condition I myself seem to have inherited), a shop fan (which produces a fantastic cooling current, I must say), a pedestal fan, the living room TV and its associated devices, and an auto shop light that would serve as both a bathroom and kitchen light and a spare outlet for our coffee brewer or our microwave.

Now, about 6 million customers lost power because of Irma, and with household estimates taken into account, somewhere around 15 million people were without power.  That amounts to about three-quarters of the entire state that lost power during Irma.  Crews from all over the country came in to give our own linemen extra sets of hands to try and get the state back online as soon as possible.  We knew we were gonna have to be patient.  Sometimes our patience was tested, and that’s partly due to how my neighborhood was built.

My neighborhood is unusual in that not all of the houses on my street are on the same power grid.  The houses on my street were not all built at the same time.  My street is a short little street that runs from north to south in a straight line, with about 10 houses lining the western side of the street, and my house is the only one on the eastern side, just a little over halfway down if you go from north to south.  The north and south ends intersect with one street each, with the street on the northern end taking a path straight to the local US highway, and the one on the southern end connects with another street that also takes a path straight to the same highway.  Right next to my house is another intersection with another small street that ends in a cul-de-sac next to some woods, through which a trail runs that connects the end of that street with the corner of another nearby one.  Now, the houses on the southern end of the street, all the way up to my house, were built first, and they share a power grid with the houses that are on the street that intersect with the southern end of my street.  Our neighbor’s house, just across the street and one house to the right from my house’s vantage point, is one of the first houses on a separate power grid, which includes the little side street that intersects near my house and the street that intersects with the northern end of my street.

What all this means is that we didn’t all lose our power the same way.  My neighbor that I mentioned?  His loss of power was likely caused by either a blown transformer or a downed tree at the northern end of our street.  Since we’re on a different grid, that had no effect on our power.  However…the street that the wooded trail connects to?  A large oak tree managed to fall on that street, which is what knocked out our power.  This was gonna take much more than 36 hours to fix.

During this whole thing, I did not leave my street, so my dad’s updates from his drive home from work were my updates to the outside when it came to what was happening in my hometown.  He had Sunday off because of the storm, but was due to return Monday night.  However, I was so uneasy about how to run things that my dad decided to take Monday night off and return Tuesday.  Monday night I slept in my bed, while parents and the dog all slept in the master bedroom.  They got the air conditioner, set to a very cool 60 degrees, and I got the shop fan set up on my floor, all with the generator refueled and running through the night to power them.  The shop fan actually did help to relieve some of my sweating…much better than the very sweaty nights I would experience during a typical powerless night.  Tuesday, we were able to come up with a routine where my dad would refuel the generator before going to work, which would allow us to run the window unit while he was gone until about 7 or 8 in the morning, when it would run out of fuel.  (Not a long wait, as he typically gets home around 9:00 am.).  Tuesday  and Wednesday nights, I slept in the master bedroom and was able to keep my mom company, as she typically has night panics these days and doesn’t like to sleep alone.  (These nights, though, I wouldn’t go to bed until at least 11:00 pm so I could make sure our DVR programming recorded on time.)  The cool air helped me sleep with minimal to no sweating.  Thursday was my dad’s first night off from in his regular schedule, but I ended up sitting out in the living room to keep an eye on our back door, which had to be cracked open to allow the extension cords to run in from outside.  I tend to get very cautious when this happens, because I prefer all the doors to be locked at night.  I ended up trying to watch Frasier reruns until my dad woke me up at 4:00 am (he typically doesn’t sleep as much on his off nights because his internal clock is so used to him being active at night), so I got a few extra hours of sleep in the cold master bedroom.

How did we eat that week?  Well, with the power out, we had no use of our stove, which meant we couldn’t cook anything or even brew iced/sweet tea (which is my dad’s favorite thing to drink: he takes it barely sweetened, only about 1/3 cup of sugar per gallon, and with 5 tea bags steeping in the water, as he likes his tea strong).  We ended up eating mostly sandwiches, fast food burgers, and pizza that week.  When our power came back on, I was so glad to finally be able to use the stove again after a week!

On Wednesday, our neighbor knocked on our door that afternoon to inform us that his power was back on and that the crews had finally begun the process of clearing out the tree that had knocked out our own power.  Unfortunately, our power did not come back on that night.  The following day, my dad had not noticed any crews working in that area that morning, but were in another part of the neighborhood.  That afternoon, after a drive around the neighborhood, he did notice something in that area, though: a power pole had been installed, but had no line hung up (though the supplies were at the site).  I immediately perked up, because I knew it was only a matter of time before our power would be back on.  Sure enough, the new transformer and power line were installed the next day, and our power finally came back on at about 10:45 Friday morning…we were into our fifth day without power.  After turning off our generator, winding up the extension cords, putting the power strips back into their proper places, and all three of us each getting a good shower 🚿, we were finally able to go back to our normal routines and put the memories of Irma behind us.

Tomorrow will mark just three weeks since Irma, and it’s already feeling like a distant memory.  But as Floridians like myself have been reminded time and time again, just because the memories are distant doesn’t give us permission to become complacent about just of what Mother Nature is capable.  We Floridians have learned this in the wake of Andrew; of Charley, Frances, and Jeanne; of Wilma; of Matthew; and of Irma.  Outside of Florida, we humans have learned this lesson through Katrina and Sandy and Mitch…and even most recently through Hurricanes Harvey and Maria.  I hope those of you who live in hurricane-prone regions take this to heart.  Heed any warnings that are given, and take them seriously.  Don’t think that you can outsmart a hurricane…because you can’t.  You will save yourself a world of trouble, or even your life.

Now, I shall close this post with a clip of the song I referenced in the title, “The Waiting” by Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers, probably the most famous rock band to ever come out of the state of Florida (although Lynyrd Skynyrd is a close second).

Until next time…

The Irma Saga, Part I: Possibly the Longest Weekend of My Life So Far

First of all, I noticed several of my followers left comments while I was away showing concern for my safety while this whole thing was happening.  With that said, I want to thank them for their concern for my well-being during Irma, as I would certainly extend the same if anything as disastrous came near their homes.

As you can see, I did indeed get through the storm in one piece.  And now you all get to hear about my experience of living through Irma!

Before I get to the Irma Saga proper, it’s probably best if I fill you in on my history with hurricanes.  Of course, I am a lifelong resident of Florida, so for many of us here, tropical cyclones come with the territory of living here, and we are very acutely aware of the risk that they pose.  I was too young and too far north to remember Hurricane Andrew, and while my family evacuated in anticipation of Hurricane Floyd in 1999, that storm ended up staying out over the ocean.  My first real experience with a hurricane came about at a very active and transitional time for me: August, 2004.  My maternal grandmother, one of my closest relatives, had died of cancer just a month earlier.  Nine days after her death, my senior portrait was taken.  In the very beginning of August, I started my senior year of high school.  But it was barely a couple of weeks into that school year when Hurricane Charley set his sights on Punta Gorda, Florida, and the I-4 Corridor from there.  I remember having to hear the sounds of the storm the night it arrived.  I could hear the thud of a tree falling by the edge of the woods near our house.  Our power was knocked out, and would stay down for a week due to the electric company not getting the call to fix our power grid, for some reason.  We ended up missing about two weeks of school because of Charley, and just as we were settling back into a routine, another hurricane, Frances, also decided to set her sights on Florida.  I remember our air conditioner blowing out just before the storm took out our power.  But that wasn’t the kicker.  On top of that, a pine tree in our backyard slowly fell onto our house.  However, it fell slowly enough that the wind basically cradled it to our roof instead of smashing it through our walls.  We were able to run across the street to our neighbor’s house before the tree hit the roof.  It did leave a hole in our roof, which we were able to patch up.  I can still see in my mind where that tree was, too.  Three weeks later came Hurricane Jeanne, and by that point I was simply thinking, “Not again…”.  And although our power was eventually restored after each hurricane, they left an effect that would last long after the storms passed, most notably when all the rainfall compromised the ground enough to cause a sinkhole to open in the road right by my high school a month or two after the hurricanes, one that would take almost the rest of the entire school year to fix.  A large maple tree that has stood across the street from my house for as long as I can remember has been slowly dying since those storms.  I remember when it would be full of green leaves in the summer; now, the top half of the tree is dead and a shadow of its former self, but somehow its lower branches still produce leaves year after year.  Those three hurricanes (and some of the last gasps of Hurricane Ivan) taught me so much about how to approach future hurricanes.  We now have our own plans in place for when storms like this come around.  But just because I know what I’m dealing with now doesn’t make dealing with them any less easier.

Enter Irma.

When the forecast models became clear that Florida would be affected by this storm in some way, shape, or form, my nerves began to build, only getting stronger and stronger as the days to landfall grew closer.  By the time Irma started making her approach towards Florida, my nerves were at such a level that was only rivaled by the health scare that my dad had a year ago and had to spend the night in the hospital.  From its landfall in the Keys until the remnants of the eye wall passed right by and right through my hometown, I couldn’t keep my eyes off of the storm coverage.  For some people, watching all that may be stressful, but for me, knowing what to expect actually helps to ease some of my worries.  Irma’s fury was getting stronger and stronger by this point.

At the storm’s peak, I remember the sounds of howling wind, rain slapping the sides of my house, and the *bang* of an exploding transformer on a nearby street.  Somehow, we managed to maintain power (with the occasional flicker) throughout the worst of the storm…only to have a fallen oak tree on another nearby street take ours out at 6:00 Monday morning, setting off a saga of its own.  Our house, thankfully, suffered no structural damage.  The worst storm damage we got was a couple of fallen oak branches to our Chrysler (which seems to be purely cosmetic damage).  There were two small dents in the hood, and there was a huge dent in the left front fender.


You see where the reflection caves in, just above the tire?  That’s where the dent is, and it measures about the size of my hand.  Luckily, the car is currently not in driving condition, as it is awaiting a replacement alternator.  Our truck escaped any damage.  Even now, two weeks out, my street is still lined with piles of dead oak branches with their now-brown leaves 🍁, all blown off from the numerous oak trees that populate my neighborhood.  Of course, as the destruction in the Keys has shown, we could’ve had it so much worse.  My family and neighbors only had to clear away oak branches.  People in the Keys will have to rebuild everything because of Irma.
We also did not flood, by virtue of sitting on land that is 60 feet above sea level and, in addition to that, being high enough and distant enough from our nearest waterway, the St. Johns River, to avoid it at its flood stage.  As of this writing, two weeks after Irma, the St. Johns is still at flood stage and is under an indefinite Flood Advisory until the waters finally begin to recede.  We also have a pretty good storm drain system for being in a neighborhood that sits on unincorporated county land.  While this storm was a rainmaker and singlehandedly put a lot of major places in Central Florida back into a rainfall year-to-date surplus, in my area it was nowhere near 2008’s Tropical Storm Fay, which spent a week over Florida and made landfall four separate times.  It drenched the entire state of Florida and had periods of almost stationary movement similar to that of Hurricane Harvey just last month.  (Fay actually did give us some street flooding, but no house flooding; I live on a hill.).  However, places like Miami, Jacksonville, Shingle Creek (considered to be the headwaters of The Everglades), and even places relatively near to me like Sanford and Astor got some pretty nasty flooding.

Waiting for Irma was quite stressful.  Going through Irma’s wrath was a bit scary.  After Irma, I’m glad that I still have my life, health, family, and a roof still over my head.  There are many who were not so lucky.  I hope those who lost everything in this storm are able to rebuild their lives and are able to return to some sense of normalcy.  And these sentiments also go out to those who’ve lost everything because of Hurricane Harvey in Texas and Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico 🇵🇷 and other places around the Caribbean that were hit by both Irma and Maria.

Coming soon, I will be posting about the power outage we went through in the aftermath of Irma, which I felt deserved its own post.  It was an…interesting experience, to say the least.  Until then…best wishes to you all.

OMG…I’m back!

You read that right…I am back, you guys!  My dad surprised me with a new tablet this afternoon…okay, actually not just any tablet…but an iPad!  I absolutely love the clarity of the screen on this, and it is just gorgeous.  He even had my name and the message “A great daughter” printed on it.  It also came with a card saying “Thank you for all you do.  Love Mom and Dad.”  (Believe me, being a homemaker is not an easy job…it actually takes a lot of effort to keep a household running smoothly and to keep my mother happy, among many other things.). I thanked him many times over, even though I did not ask for it, or for anything.  My dad is just the kind to randomly surprise his loved ones like that.  (Side note, he’s even been known to do this for my soon-to-be sister in law.  It involved a leaf blower and a kiddie pool for my niece.).  It’s just beautiful, and I have a feeling this is gonna be the beginning of a beautiful partnership.  I even tested out the camera on it on my dog, and it is just a thing of beauty.


Of course, my dog is a thing of beauty as well.

I know you’re probably wondering what’s been going on since I had to leave so suddenly, and I hope to write about those in the coming days, but you can understand me wanting to reconnect to the interwebs after about a month away, right?  Here’s a teaser of what I will be writing about in the coming days:

  • Knitting (duh…and I’ve been doing a bit of it!)
  • Crocheting (my first crochet project in quite a while, even though it was a small, quick project.)
  • And since some of you did express your concerns in the comments, I will be writing about my experience living through Hurricane Irma.  As you can see by my post, I am doing fine and am safe and sound, as are my family and my brother and his family.  Anyone who lived through the Three Hurricanes of 2004 that hit Florida in a span of six weeks will understand my experience (and yes, I lived through Those Three Hurricanes as well).

For now…I’m gonna be fiddling around with this new thing!

Everything Under the Sun is in Tune, But the Sun is Eclipsed by the Moon

If you are a Pink Floyd fan like I am, you will recognize that those words in the title are the final lines of the final song, “Eclipse”, in the legendary Pink Floyd album, The Dark Side of the Moon.  I felt this was appropriate, given this post is about my eclipse experience.

Unfortunately, my area of Florida was not in the path of totality, so we were only going to get about 85% coverage of the Sun at the maximum point of the eclipse.  Unfortunately for me, I didn’t get a good view of the eclipse in maximum phase because Mother Nature had her own plans.  However, I was still able to get some photos to illustrate the eclipse’s effects on us here.  On the bright side, I did get a little view of the final stages through my pinhole viewer.

Ah, the pinhole viewer.  I wasn’t able to find eclipse glasses, so I made a a pinhole viewer instead.

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Top view of my pinhole viewer.

I used a cereal box, some white paper to cover the bottom of the box, some aluminum foil, tape, and a knitting needle to poke the 3 mm pinhole.  It only took me about 20 minutes to put together on Sunday.  It worked like a charm, even in light to medium cloud cover.

Fast forward to about 1:20 PM Eastern Time.  This was the view out of my bedroom window:

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Yeah, my window’s a bit dirty.

Here is the view from the same window at 2:00 and again at 2:30.

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To get an idea as to how much the eclipse and the cloud cover affected the ambient light inside, here are side by side pictures of the same corner of my room, one with the blinds open, the other with the blinds closed.

Normally, at this particular time of day in the summer, the rooms on this side of the house (the western side, which faces our front yard) are quite bright with sunlight unless thick cumulonimbus storm clouds have come into the area.  While the clouds here were a little thicker than normal, the color of the clouds shows that they were far from cumulonimbus (which are a very dark gray on the bottom when approaching).  Here is what I ended up seeing in the sky around the time of maximum eclipse:

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Gray.  Gray and cloudy.  So, unfortunately, I was not able to see the maximum point of the eclipse where I was, inland.  However, I hear that the weather was a little better at the coastline and even in Orlando.  So, this ended up being my view of the actual eclipse as it appeared in Florida:

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A shot of our TV screen with a live shot of the eclipse as it appeared in Orlando near maximum eclipse.

But, just because I wasn’t able to actually see the eclipse doesn’t mean I missed out on experiencing it.  We still saw some noticeable effects from the eclipse, even with the cloud cover.  For one, we did notice a notable dimming of the sunlight, and as I mentioned, it got about as dark indoors (with no artificial light, we had just the blinds open the entire time) as it normally does when a thunderstorm comes through here, even though the cloud cover wasn’t as heavy and as dark of a gray color as it has when a thunderstorm is approaching.  I probably would’ve had okay visibility with the pinhole viewer if the clouds weren’t opaque, but unfortunately, Mother Nature decided otherwise.  Another noticeable effect we experienced during the maximum stages of the eclipse was the drop in temperature.  This time of year, even in thunderstorm conditions, it is normally quite hot and humid in the afternoon hours, if not in the upper 80s Fahrenheit, then at least in the low 90s.  This time of year, the humidity is enough to break me out into a sweat within 30 seconds to a minute of stepping outside.  When my mom and I stepped outside during the maximum eclipse period, I immediately noticed a difference in temperature.  It felt like it was in the upper 70s or low 80s at this point.  I was not sweating, either.  In fact, it felt quite nice, despite the slight shower that had just popped up (only enough for rain droplets to show up on the cars in our front yard). 

Alas, within an hour, it was already heating back up.  The clouds took so long to clear out that I really only got to use my pinhole viewer for the very end of the eclipse.  Had it been a couple of hours earlier or a couple of hours later, ironically enough, we would’ve had pretty good skies to view it.  Funny how nature likes to mess with us in the weirdest moments.

Here is another side by side picture of the view outside, with an image of the eclipse as seen in Orlando at maximum:

For those of you who actually got to see the total eclipse in person, kudos to you!  The shots I saw of totality during the CBS coverage of the eclipse were quite stunning, and it is definitely a dream of mine to be able to see a total eclipse in person during my lifetime.  Perhaps I’ll find a way to travel to the path of totality when the next solar eclipse comes around in seven years’ time, in 2024.

Before I go, I’d like to leave you with the song that inspired the title of this post, or should I say songs?  The Dark Side of the Moon is one of my favorite albums of all time, and although a lot of people have been playing or downloading Bonnie Tyler’s “Total Eclipse of the Heart” for this event, I found both “Brain Damage” and “Eclipse” from this album playing in my head.

(“You’re So Vain” was also an earworm at one point, too.  “Walking On the Moon”, strangely enough, was not.)

On Being 30 and Single

Pardon me for the radio silence…I’ve been chugging away on my afghan (about 3/4 of the way finished now on the main portion and I just got the yarn in the border color a couple of days ago), but other than that I’ve been dealing with general blogger’s block.  That is, until yesterday.  Let’s see, I recently started emailing an old friend of mine from when I was attending college (I only attended for three semesters at a local community college before dropping out due to financial and transportation problems, and I still have aspirations to return someday to finish the associate’s degree I started; this friend and I attended the same high school, graduating a year apart, but we didn’t meet until college), and when I informed him of my brother’s wedding date, he responded with a somewhat cynical email about all of his friends’ marriages that he’d seen fall apart.  I kindly let him know how cynical he sounded, and his response and my reply ended up being quite reflective of something that I don’t think gets talked about a lot in a real, honest manner: the experience of being a single thirtysomething.  What follows is reflective of my experience, and my experience alone, of being single and in my thirties (granted, I am only four months into being in my thirties, but I am in my thirties).

I don’t have much of a dating history, just one date in high school to my senior prom, and that was 12 years ago.  I haven’t been on a date since, and while it bugged me quite a bit in my 20s, it doesn’t bug me so much anymore now in my 30s.  Sure, I get the occasional questions asking why I don’t have a boyfriend or (on rare occasions) the assumption that because I don’t have a boyfriend that I’m into girls (sorry, I have no interest in playing with other ladies’ fun parts), but otherwise, it doesn’t bother me and I don’t care if it bothers anyone else.  Other than that one date, I really have no other experience other than that of being perpetually single. It hasn’t been easy, but I tend to approach this with the mindset that I’d rather date few men of quality than a sizable quantity of men and hoping I strike gold.  Unfortunately for me, there aren’t a lot of quality men where I live.  Where I live, the ones that aren’t married are the type where I take one look at them and I know I could do better.  Most of the quality men where I live have usually had the sense to move away to pursue better opportunities than what’s necessarily available in small town and suburban Florida.  And what remains are men of simpler means and simpler needs, the kind that like to go four-wheeling, mudding, or fishing.  I have never been an outdoors type of person.  Not a lot of these men are into reading the kind of books I like to read, or would be willing to pay attention to my thinking out loud about my knitting or other creative endeavors, or share my ideas and opinions on things that matter to me.  Sometimes I think I was born in the wrong part of the country.  I’m the kind of girl who knows what she likes and knows what she needs in a potential boyfriend or husband: I need someone who challenges me mentally; who is a voice of encouragement in whatever I decide to do; and who will allow me to be my own ridiculous, opinionated, goofy, intuitive self without trying place his own expectations on me and holding me up to be something I can’t.  I’m, among other things, a terrible housekeeper, a pretty good cook, a somewhat masculine woman in personality (though I am not above wearing a dress or a shorter skirt when I want to feel feminine, which isn’t very often), and unashamed of my geekdom.  I know by this point I will never be a girly-girl, a supermodel/beauty queen, June Cleaver, or a trophy wife…but I hope I can still be a nice match for somebody.  I know at this point in my life, though, I am not settling for anything.  I deserve the best, and I’m okay with admitting it.

It seems like society often looks down on people my age who are still single.  And true, a lot of people in my age group are starting to marry and have families of their own.  And yet, no matter if it’s the government or a religious group, most social institutions seem to value people more if they’re married: married people get tax breaks, married people get to have children without being judged for having them out of wedlock, married people are more trustworthy because the single person might try to *gasp* sleep with your spouse!  Sometimes it feels like in the eyes of society, though I may not be worthless, because I am single I am literally worth less in social capital.  Now, all this may have been an issue in my twenties, but honestly, now that I’m in my thirties, I don’t care.

I think I’m happier now being single at 30 than I was being single at 20; part of it is just understanding myself a little better as a person and being able to own my flaws, and the other part is just the fact that there isn’t really any pressure for me to fit in anymore. In your twenties, you’re coming out of adolescence and trying to find your place in the world, and people place a lot of expectations on you; in your thirties, you’re more assured of yourself and feeling more confident in your own decisions and aspirations. I feel no personal pressure to date, I feel no pressure to marry, and I feel no pressure to have a child.  I’ve accepted the possibility that my life may not necessarily include a husband or children. I could be happier when it comes to things I want to do in life (career, education, traveling, et cetera), but where I am right now is where I’m needed.  I could be happier with how I feel about my looks, but then again, it’s all superficial anyway.  But I’m content with where my life is right now for the first time in a long time.  I’m not angry with the world.  I’m not angry at anyone.  And I’m not angry with where life has taken me.  I could be happy, but if content is all the universe wants to give me right now, then I’m okay with it.  At this point I am just along for the ride, and I hope I can get as much out of life as I can.  I wasted my twenties with fear, anger, and cynicism.  I hope I won’t do the same with my thirties.

I hope other single thirtysomethings out there can take some solace in my thoughts and know that their worth is not determined by their relationship or marital status.  And those that do have love in their lives, know that what you have is rare, special, and something that not everyone will get a chance to experience in this life.  Cherish it, treasure it, and don’t let small things get in the way of the bigger picture.  And to those out there perpetually single like me, don’t fret over it; take the opportunity to learn great things about yourselves, appreciate all of your strengths and own your flaws, and don’t be afraid to put yourself first.  Singlehood should no longer be a scarlet letter, a badge of shame.  Singlehood may be a part of my life, but it doesn’t define my life.  I’m a geek, a knitter, an aunt, a daughter, a sister, a friend, a blogger, and a smartass who just happens to be 30 and single.

Some Knitting & An Announcement

It’s been an interesting week, to say the least.

First, the knitting.  I’ve had quite a bit of knitting time this week because my dad decided to take the week off from work (he used one of his vacation weeks), so it hasn’t been so busy around here.  I was able to finish another motif of small squares that I was working on (15 squares in a diagonal orientation, going from 5 squares in the first row, to 4 squares in the second row, and so on, all the way down to one square.  The rows alternated between pink and purple.

And here’s how it’s looking so far.

First, the wide shot of the whole thing.

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Now, it is folded up in a couple of places to make room for most of it to be seen on my bed, but the section I was just working on is in the lower left-hand portion of the photo.  As you can see, it has pretty much caught up with the 25-square checkerboard I finished last month.  In fact, that pink square at the very upper-left hand corner of the latest section (which you will see in more detail shortly) marks 10 small squares up that particular side.  I have reached a pretty big milestone: I have filled in a little over half of this afghan, which measures 18 small squares by 18 small squares.  When I resume work on this project, I will be working some more on the right-hand side of the afghan and starting to fill that in.  Considering I started this nearly four months ago with some leftover scrap yarn and decided to go with it, it’s not bad at all.  (Of course, we have had to purchase more yarn for this over the months, but I’ve only added a skein or two at a time.)

Here are some more detailed pics of the most recent section I was working on:

The first pic is a wide shot as it sits on the afghan, the second is more of a close-up, and the third is from the angle that I actually knitted them onto the piece.  I started with a row of five baby pink squares, then the next row of squares was variegated purple, then a row of variegated pink, then the solid gemstone purple, and capped it off with the strawberry pink square.

All right.  I made a reference to an “announcement” in the title of this post, and I will string you along no longer.

The announcement is:

There will be a wedding in the somewhat near future.  No, not mine.

My brother and his girlfriend got engaged this week!

I found out the news when she sent a picture of her engagement ring to my dad’s phone on Wednesday night (although my dad had already gone to bed by then), followed by a simple text saying “We got engaged” about 15 minutes later.  I’m not expecting them to set a date just yet, so no word on any wedding plans for the time being.  Although I must say that I have been privately calling her my “sister-in-law” for some time now.  It’ll be nice for them to finally make it legal, and I’m very happy for them.

Until next time…have a great day!